Canned food principles thermal process control pdf article is about commercial canning. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

30 years in an edible state. Although appearance, smell and vitamin content had deteriorated, there was no trace of microbial growth and the 109-year-old food was determined to be still safe to eat. French government offered a hefty cash award of 12,000 francs to any inventor who could devise a cheap and effective method of preserving large amounts of food. The larger armies of the period required increased and regular supplies of quality food. Limited food availability was among the factors limiting military campaigns to the summer and autumn months.

French confectioner and brewer, observed that food cooked inside a jar did not spoil unless the seals leaked, and developed a method of sealing food in glass jars. Appert was awarded the prize in 1810 by Count Montelivert, a French minister of the interior. European countries and in the US. A Dixie Can Sealer for home use.

London and used British merchant Peter Durand as an agent to patent his own idea in 1810. Bryan Donkin developed the process of packaging food in sealed airtight cans, made of tinned wrought iron. Initially, the canning process was slow and labour-intensive, as each large can had to be hand-made, and took up to six hours to cook, making canned food too expensive for ordinary people. 3000 worth of canned meat in six months. Arctic in HMS Fury, during his search for a northwestern passage to India. One of these cans was opened in 1939, and was edible and nutritious, though it was not analysed for contamination by the lead solder used in its manufacture. Increasing mechanization of the canning process, coupled with a huge increase in urban populations across Europe, resulted in a rising demand for canned food.

A number of inventions and improvements followed, and by the 1860s smaller machine-made steel cans were possible, and the time to cook food in sealed cans had been reduced from around six hours to thirty minutes. Demand for canned food greatly increased during wars. The late 19th century saw the range of canned food available to urban populations greatly increase, as canners competed with each other using novel foodstuffs, highly decorated printed labels, and lower prices. 1916, widespread boredom with cheap canned food amongst soldiers resulted in militaries purchasing better-quality food to improve morale and the complete meals in a can began to appear. After the war, companies that had supplied military canned food improved the quality of their goods for civilian sale. Cans are cheaper and quicker to make, and much less fragile than glass jars. This airtight nature is crucial to keeping micro-organisms out of the can and keeping its contents sealed inside.

Thus, double seamed cans are also known as Sanitary Cans. A can thus sealed is impervious to contamination by creating two tight continuous folds between the can’s cylindrical body and the lids. Double seaming uses rollers to shape the can, lid and the final double seam. To make a sanitary can and lid suitable for double seaming, manufacture begins with a sheet of coated tin plate. To create the can body, rectangles are cut and curled around a die, and welded together creating a cylinder with a side seam.

Rollers are then used to flare out one or both ends of the cylinder to create a quarter circle flange around the circumference. Precision is required to ensure that the welded sides are perfectly aligned, as any misalignment will cause inconsistent flange shape, compromising its integrity. A circle is then cut from the sheet using a die cutter. The circle is shaped in a stamping press to create a downward countersink to fit snugly into the can body. The outer edge is then curled down and around about 140 degrees using rollers to create the end curl.

The result is a steel tube with a flanged edge, and a countersunk steel disc with a curled edge. The body and end are brought together in a seamer and held in place by the base plate and chuck, respectively. The result is the countersink of the end sits inside the top of the can body just below the flange. The end curl protrudes slightly beyond the flange. Once brought together in the seamer, the seaming head presses a first operation roller against the end curl. The end curl is pressed against the flange curling it in toward the body and under the flange.

The flange is also bent downward, and the end and body are now loosely joined together. The first operation roller is then retracted. At this point five thicknesses of steel exist in the seam. The seaming head then engages the second operation roller against the partly formed seam.