How to make a pdf searchable chromebook article is about Google’s book search engine. Books are provided either by publishers and authors, through the Google Books Partner Program, or by Google’s library partners, through the Library Project.

Additionally, Google has partnered with a number of magazine publishers to digitize their archives. The Google Books Library Project, which scans works in the collections of library partners and adds them to the digital inventory, was announced in December 2004. In response to search queries, Google Books allows users to view full pages from books in which the search terms appear, if the book is out of copyright or if the copyright owner has given permission. If Google believes the book is still under copyright, a user sees “snippets” of text around the queried search terms. All instances of the search terms in the book text appear with a yellow highlight. In-print books acquired through the Partner Program are also available for full view if the publisher has given permission, although this is rare.

For in-print books where permission has been granted, the number of viewable pages is limited to a “preview” set by a variety of access restrictions and security measures, some based on user-tracking. Usually, the publisher can set the percentage of the book available for preview. Users are restricted from copying, downloading or printing book previews. A watermark reading “Copyrighted material” appears at the bottom of pages. All books acquired through the Partner Program are available for preview. Google does not have permission of the copyright owner to display a preview. This could be because Google cannot identify the owner or the owner declined permission.

If a search term appears many times in a book, Google displays no more than three snippets, thus preventing the user from viewing too much of the book. Also, Google does not display any snippets for certain reference books, such as dictionaries, where the display of even snippets can harm the market for the work. Google maintains that no permission is required under copyright law to display the snippet view. Google also displays search results for books that have not been digitized. ISBN, subject and copyright information, and in some cases, a table of contents and book summary is available. In effect, this is similar to an online library card catalog. August 2005, through which copyright owners could provide a list of titles that it did not want scanned, and Google would respect the request.

Google also stated that it would not scan any in-copyright books between August and 1 November 2005, to provide the owners with the opportunity to decide which books to exclude from the Project. It can participate in the Partner Program to make a book available for preview or full view, in which case it would share revenue derived from the display of pages from the work in response to user queries. It can let Google scan the book under the Library Project and display snippets in response to user queries. It can opt out of the Library Project, in which case Google will not scan the book. If the book has already been scanned, Google will reset its access level as ‘No preview’. Most scanned works are no longer in print or commercially available. Google, which is made available on Google Books for preview.

They can also choose to make the book fully viewable, and even allow users to download a PDF copy. Books can also be made available for sale on Google Play. Unlike the Library Project, this does not raise any copyright concerns as it is conducted pursuant to an agreement with the publisher. The publisher can choose to withdraw from the agreement at any time. For many books, Google Books displays the original page numbers. The project began in 2002 under the codename Project Ocean. 2002, it took 40 minutes for them to digitize a 300-page book.

But soon after the technology had been developed to the extent that scanning operators could scan up to 6000 pages an hour. Google established designated scanning centers to which books were transported by trucks. The stations could digitize at the rate of 1,000 pages per hour. The books were placed in a custom-built mechanical cradle that adjusted the book spine in place for the scanning.