The differential diagnosis of hypereosinophilia is broad and includes asthma, atopic disease, drug hypersensitivity, parasitic infection, connective tissue disorders, malignancy, and rare hypereosinophilic disorders. Hypereosinophilia in children has not been well characterized to date. The objective of this study was to identify the common causes of marked eosinophilia in children and to characterize and compare hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting as a stroke pdf clinical symptoms at presentation, laboratory findings, final diagnosis, and therapeutic responses between children and adults with hypereosinophilic syndromes. All subjects underwent standardized clinical and laboratory evaluations with yearly follow-up.

Clinical and laboratory parameters, final diagnoses, treatment responses, and outcomes were assessed. Despite these differences, corticosteroid responsiveness and overall prognosis were similar between the 2 groups. Although children with HES often present with higher peak eosinophil counts than adults, the differential diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of HES are similar in the 2 groups. This project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Cancer Institute, NIH under Contract No. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government.

This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Conflicts of interest: The authors declare that they have no relevant conflicts. Most infectious pathogens have anecdotal evidence to support a link with stroke, but certain pathogens have more robust associations, in which causation is probable. Few dedicated prospective studies of stroke in the setting of infection have been done. The use of head imaging, a clinical standard of diagnostic care, to confirm stroke and stroke type is not universal.

Data for stroke are scarce in locations where infections are probably most common, making it difficult to reach conclusions on how populations differ in terms of risk of infectious stroke. The treatment of infections and stroke, when concomitant, is based on almost no evidence and requires dedicated efforts to understand variations that might exist. We highlight the present knowledge and emphasise the need for stronger evidence to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and secondary prevention of stroke in patients in whom an infectious cause for stroke is probable. Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution. The differential diagnosis of hypereosinophilia is broad and includes asthma, atopic disease, drug hypersensitivity, parasitic infection, connective tissue disorders, malignancy, and rare hypereosinophilic disorders. Hypereosinophilia in children has not been well characterized to date.